Is Pinot Gris the slut of wine grapes?

1

Firstly, I am a big fan of Pinot Gris and I don’t mean to dis the grape. I love the many ways in which it expresses itself. It is a hardy grape with the ability to grow and flourish in so many parts of the world – unlike its finicky brother Pinot Noir. But let’s be honest, this grape gets around! From Switzerland to Italy, Canada to South America, Australia and New Zealand to South Africa, there seems to be no part of the wine growing world this grape has not infiltrated.

In B.C., Pinot Gris has become the most planted white wine grape replacing the former star, Chardonnay. Much of that is due to popular demand, as people grew tired of oaky Chards they turned to the refreshing, tropical and stone fruit flavours found in Pinot Gris. It can ripen sufficiently in even the toughest climates in the Province, which is why it is fairly popular in the Wine Islands region of the Province. Here, it expressed lively acidity (which is ideal for sparkling) and flavours of citrus and stone fruits while the Okanagan produces a more lush flavour profile depending on the sub-region. It can be oaked, carbonated, produced to exhibit bright acidity or lush buttery flavours – everything Chardonnay can do and more! Quite frankly, I don’t know anyone that doesn’t enjoy a well made Pinot Gris.

But wine, like clothing and other consumable products, goes in and out of fashion. As consumers become more knowledgeable and develop more experienced palettes, their tastes change. So, as time goes on we are likely to see something new take over the market but until then, pass the Pinot Gris!

Foot notes:

Pinot Gris, Pinot Noir, Pinot Blanc and Pinot Meunier (Pinot Grigio is Italian for Pinot Gris while Rulander is the German name) are all the same grape unlike Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet franc and Sauvignon Blanc which are related but distinctly different. Among the Pinot’s there are only slight genetic mutations of this grape producing colour variations only which is why you see pinks and copper colours in Gris which stems from Pinot Noir. The word “Pinot” is derived from the French word, “Pin” or pine to denote “pine like” as the grape clusters resemble that of a pine cone.

Cheers

Share.

About Author

Peter Marion

1 Comment

Leave A Reply